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Posts tagged ‘Offset’

Re: Owning Keys

February 13, 2011

Charles

Maybe I was a little hasty. Crucially when it comes to keys, animators need to know the reference a value exists in – and that, it shouldn’t change.  For example if I animate a guy jumping from one platform to another – the curves of the jumping, moving from and to the platforms shouldn’t pop erratically to allow its reference space to change. More over the the space the values are relative to should be transformed.

Offsets

The offset is a great mechanism for retaining space – it wouldn’t be a good mechanism for FK/IK systems because your trying to force the IK/FK into its opposite – i.e you want its value to change. Can we form a rule here?  When you want the value to change directly transform the object, when you want to retain the value transform the objects parent space.

But..

You still need to allow this approach to be understood by the animator. The offset needs to be understandable, accessible and crucially clean-able!. Any system  that transforms an object by an offset will encounter pops and hitches if the keys of the offset change, get moved or deleted. (Another reason to place them in there own area – attributes etc)

A really, really indispensable PDF on BVH and motion capture formats.

September 16, 2009

Charles

I found this PDF on motion capture formats – funnily enough its called “Motion Capture File Formats Explained” and it is really essential if you’re trying to figure out why everything appears to work but doesn’t.

Motion Capture Formats Explained

Read on from page 16 if you like me, having built a correct matrix from the global data and offset find out that inaccuracies get past done the chain because of discrepancies in this very global matrix (due to the communicative problems of matrices). I will add this to my research page, and possibly keep a copy on my server for backup.

More on matrices: basics

May 30, 2009

Charles

Most object transforms in 3d software are matrices’ heres a rough breakdown of what they are.

A matrix in 3d is an axis defined by three vectors: X,Y and Z and fourth being it’s positional offset from an origin. The length of each axis from the origin defines the scale of that axis; 1.0 being 100%. The ‘identity’ matrix is an objects base transform e.g.

matrix3 [1,0,0] [0,1,0] [0,0,1] [0,0,0] – for the X, Y, Z axis’ and the positional offset from the origin.

So for instance if we wanted to scale an object by 200% along its X axis our matrix transform would look like this – matrix3 [2,0,0] [0,1,0] [0,0,1] [0,0,0]

Notice also that each axis is perpendicular to each other axis (90 degrees) – this is important is if it wasnt we would get skewing. Now each axis’ can point in any direction as long as the other two are perpendicular to it.